Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
GET RECOGNIZED.
Let an ISACA® certification
elevate your career.

Register today and save
World Wide Web
DDoS Protection Powered By Verisign
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Google To Comply with E.U.'s 'Right To Be Forgotten' Ruling

Google To Comply with E.U.'s 'Right To Be Forgotten' Ruling
By Seth Fitzgerald

Share
Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Share on Google Plus

CEO Larry Page said Google is a big company and it can comply with rulings like the E.U.'s "right to be forgotten" ruling and spend money on them and deal with them. But unlike Google, the burden that the E.U.'s right to be forgotten ruling puts on small businesses and start-ups may be too significant for them to handle.
 


Search engine giant Google has created a formal link removal process for consumers in the European Union (EU) who would like to utilize the newly created “right to be forgotten." At the same time as Google is complying with the new rules, CEO Larry Page said that they could greatly affect start-ups and make it harder for small businesses to grow like Google.

The European Court of Justice ruled earlier this month that search engines like Google can be forced to take down links to content that is incorrect, irrelevant, or no longer relevant. Many people responded negatively to the ruling, stating that content removal should not be Google's job but rather the job of the sites who publish the content. Not only does removing links not take the content offline, it simply makes Google's job more difficult while giving people a way to erase parts of their history from the Internet.

Compliance With Rules

In accordance with the new E.U. rules, Google is accepting requests from people who would like to have links removed from the search engine. With a simple Web form, people can make requests to have certain links removed. However, they must do so by providing their names, e-mail addresses, as well as explain how the linked pages are related to them and why the search results are "irrelevant, outdated, or otherwise inappropriate."

Google does have a say in the matter and is able to refuse certain requests, but that does not prevent consumers from pursuing action against Google in a different way. The court has ruled that if Google refuses a request, people can reach out to the applicable data protection authorities. The search engine has requested that people provide some explanation as to why the links should be removed and it said that any decision will be carefully considered.

Strong Criticism

Immediately after the E.U. handed down its ruling, Google's legal team announced that they were still trying to figure out how the ruling would actually affect the search engine. With a better grasp of what the right to be forgotten is, Page has said the court may have gotten it wrong. In an interview with the Financial Times, Page said that he wished Google had been given the chance to be truly involved in the European debate over user privacy.

Even though the E.U. may have good intentions and is trying to protect user privacy with the ruling, Page assumes that in the future, people will abuse the the right. Additionally, the burden that the right to be forgotten puts on small businesses may be too significant for them to handle.

“We’re a big company and we can respond to these kind of concerns and spend money on them and deal with them, it’s not a problem for us,” said Page. “But as a whole, as we regulate the Internet, I think we’re not going to see the kind of innovation we’ve seen.”

Some analysts are already saying that the ruling could end up being reversed, but for the time being, Google will have to manually consider and respond to thousands of link removal requests.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Micheal:

Posted: 2014-06-02 @ 2:45am PT
A 'right' to be forgotten. Only in a world where people obsess about the law. That PUKE, Bill Clinton, immortalized it best when he said: 'it depends on what your definition of the word IS, is'.



Salesforce.com is the market and technology leader in Software-as-a-Service. Its award-winning CRM solution helps 82,400 customers worldwide manage and share business information over the Internet. Experience CRM success. Click here for a FREE 30-day trial.


 World Wide Web
1.   Twitter May Remove Pics of Deceased
2.   Google Buys Contextual Image Startup
3.   Google IPO Began Decade of Big Bets
4.   Assange Talks of Leaving Embassy
5.   Russian Hacker To Be Held Until Trial


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Cost of Target Data Breach: $148 Million
The now infamous Target data breach is still costing the company -- and its shareholders -- plenty. In fact, the retailing giant forecast the December 2013 incident cost shareholders $148 million.
 
Aruba Networks Handles Black Hat with Aplomb
It's not an easy job. Aruba Networks' task throughout the Black Hat USA conference in Las Vegas this month was to ensure thousands of attendees could connect without malicious attacks.
 
Chinese Hackers Nab Info on Millions of U.S. Patients
A group of Chinese hackers has stolen the personal information, including names and Social Security numbers, of about 4.5 million patients at hospitals operated by Community Health Systems.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Three New Lenovo PCs Aimed at Business Users
Businesses everywhere want computing solutions that do more for less money, and Lenovo has unveiled three new desktop PCs that offer solid computing at a budget-minded price.
 
Aruba Networks Handles Black Hat with Aplomb
It's not an easy job. Aruba Networks' task throughout the Black Hat USA conference in Las Vegas this month was to ensure thousands of attendees could connect without malicious attacks.
 
Compression, Deduplication Come to Violin Concerto 2200
Violin Memory has announced that data deduplication and compression capabilities are now available on its Concerto 2200 solution. Typically, users will experience deduplication rates between 6:1 and 10:1.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Apple Stock Soars Ahead of iPhone 6 Launch
The imminent release of the iPhone 6 -- and maybe even an iWatch -- has sent Apple's stock soaring to new heights. Considering what else the firm could have up its sleeve -- the stratosphere may be the limit.
 
HTC Debuts Windows Phone Version of One M8 Smartphone
HTC is bringing the Windows Phone mobile OS to its flagship One M8 device -- the first time any mainstream flagship smartphone has been offered with a choice of operating systems.
 
Verizon Earns Top Rating in Mobile Network Comparison
A new report says Verizon Wireless was the top-performing U.S. cellphone service provider in the first half of 2014, on a nationwide and state-by-state basis, as well as in metro areas.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.