HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
NEWS & INFORMATION FOR TECHNOLOGY PURCHASERS. UPDATED 11 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Personal Tech / Review: Advances in Smartwatches
Close the insights gap
Between you and your customers with Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
See real-time CRM work
Review: Evolutionary Advances in New Smartwatches
Review: Evolutionary Advances in New Smartwatches
By Anick Jesdanun Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JULY
07
2014


New Android wristwatches from Samsung and LG make a few evolutionary advances, though I won't be rushing out to buy either.

Samsung's Gear Live and LG's G Watch are good products and will appeal to those who like to be among the first to own new gadgets.

The watches serve as pedometers and let you catch up on email, texts and Facebook notifications while your phone is in your pocket or charging in the bedroom. Even with the phone in your hand, you can check messages on the watch and keep playing video on the phone.

Both smartwatches try to keep things simple through voice commands rather than touch. They use Google's Android Wear system, which I reviewed earlier.

Android Wear has a lot of potential but still lacks the functionality of even last year's smartwatches. Your ability to reply is limited, and there's not much you can do yet without a companion phone nearby.

The companion phone must run Android 4.3 or later, which covers about a quarter of the Android devices in use. It doesn't have to be a Samsung or LG phone. Visit http://g.co/WearCheck from your phone to check compatibility. Don't even bother if you have an iPhone.

Even with its release of the Gear Live, Samsung will continue to sell the Gear 2 line of smartwatches, so I'll start there.

Samsung's Gear 2 ($299, released in April):

I find the Gear 2 most useful for its fitness features. The watch counts the steps you take each day. It estimates distance and calories burned and measures heart rate on your runs, hikes and bike rides. The features are rather basic, so active users might prefer a gadget dedicated to a specific task, such as measuring distance and pace using GPS. But the Gear 2 does offer a good introduction to newcomers.

Shots from the watch's 2-megapixel camera are mediocre, but that beats missing the shot entirely because your better camera is in your pocket or handbag. If you don't need the camera, you can save $100 with the Gear 2 Neo, which has similar features otherwise. Both have speakerphones for making phone calls.

The Gear 2 line doesn't use Android Wear, but a fledging system called Tizen. Samsung says that helps extend battery life to two or three days, instead of the single day on the original, Android-based Galaxy Gear. Unlike the Android Wear watches, the Gear 2 and the Gear 2 Neo both require a Samsung phone. (continued...)

1  2  Next Page >



© 2014 Associated Press/AP Online under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
TOP STORIES NOW
MAY INTEREST YOU
Salesforce.com is the market and technology leader in Software-as-a-Service. Its award-winning CRM solution helps 82,400 customers worldwide manage and share business information over the Internet. Experience CRM success. Click here for a FREE 30-day trial.
MORE IN PERSONAL TECH

Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

© Copyright 2014 NewsFactor Network, Inc. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.