Dear Visitor,

Our system has found that you are using an ad-blocking browser add-on.

We just wanted to let you know that our site content is, of course, available to you absolutely free of charge.

Our ads are the only way we have to be able to bring you the latest high-quality content, which is written by professional journalists, with the help of editors, graphic designers, and our site production and I.T. staff, as well as many other talented people who work around the clock for this site.

So, we ask you to add this site to your Ad Blocker’s "white list" or to simply disable your Ad Blocker while visiting this site.

Continue on this site freely
  HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
NEWS & INFORMATION FOR TECHNOLOGY PURCHASERS. UPDATED 3 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Enterprise I.T. / Lessons from Verizon's Threat Report
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
By Jennifer LeClaire / NewsFactor Network Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
APRIL
23
2014
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. Meanwhile, use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way cybercriminals gain access to corporate Relevant Products/Services. So says the 2014 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report.

With 511 incidents, there’s more than a three-fold increase in cyberespionage compared with the 2013 report. Retail point-of-sale (POS) attacks continue to trend downward. And the report points out that 85 percent of insider and privilege-abuse attacks used the corporate LAN, and 22 percent took advantage of physical access.

The trends are clear, but what does all this mean for the Relevant Products/Services? We caught up with Tom Cross, director of Relevant Products/Services research at network security solution provider Lancope, to get his opinion on the takeaways from the report. He told us the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report paints a picture of how point-of-sale attacks have evolved.

Adopt Unappealing Technology

“POS terminals that are directly connected to the open Internet by small businesses represent low hanging fruit that is incredibly easy to pluck,” said Cross. “In the past year we know that POS malware was used in much more sophisticated attacks against larger, better defended retail establishments.”

Cross said this process mirrors what we expect to see with other kinds of embedded systems associated with the Internet of Things. If there is a business model associated with attacking devices, he said, it will be pursued. If those attacks prove lucrative, they’ll be repeated. It’s all about one motive: money.

Cross’ favorite recommendation in the report is the suggestion that organizations adopt unappealing technology in order to deter theft.

“It reminds me of a scene in one of William Gibson's novels in which someone is applying spray-on rust to a brand new bicycle in order to make it look unattractive to thieves,” Cross said. “Sometimes, having the latest tech gadgets can make you a target, and it’s all the more troublesome if you happened to have loaded a bunch of sensitive information onto that gadget right before it grew legs.”

Reactions to the Report

Here are some other reactions from security experts:

Eric Chiu, president and cofounder at HyTrust, the cloud control company, said, “This report, combined with major breaches such as Target, Michaels, Adobe and Edward Snowden, should be a wake-up call to every organization to rethink security from an 'inside-out' model and assume the bad guy is already on the network. Companies need to implement access controls, role-based monitoring and Relevant Products/Services encryption to ensure that critical systems and sensitive data are protected.”

Adam Kujawa, head of malware intelligence at Malwarebytes, an anti-malware software company, said, “Moving forward, we can expect the government actor underworld we have been hearing so much about in the news and the cybercriminal underworld we experience first-hand to start and use the same tactics. While we are going to continue to see the slew of banker Trojans, information stealing malware and tech support or anti-virus scammers, the larger organizations will go after bigger targets.”

And Kevin O'Brien, director of Product Marketing at CloudLock, a cloud security firm, said, “Notably, there are no major breaches coming from the public cloud sector. That doesn't mean that the cloud is immune to breach or loss, but rather, this is likely the next major front for security incidents.”

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
MORE IN ENTERPRISE I.T.
NEWSFACTOR.COM
NEWSFACTOR NETWORK SITES
NEWSFACTOR SERVICES
© Copyright 2016 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.