Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Mobile Tech
Tame your scariest paperwork. Find Out How
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Goodbye 4G, Hello Samsung
Goodbye 4G, Hello Samsung's 5G?

By Barry Levine
May 13, 2013 10:10AM

    Bookmark and Share
Samsung said it is planning to make 5G network technology available by 2020, which is also when the European Commission has said it expects to have its 5G technology up and running. Analyst Avi Greengart said that, even though the speed of the still-rolling-out 4G LTE networks can seem quite impressive, more speed "is always beneficial."
 

Related Topics

Samsung
5G
4G LTE
Wireless
Carriers



Download a high-def movie on your smartphone in less than a second. That's one of the possibilities that could be commonplace within a decade, if Samsung's new 5G technology takes hold.

On Sunday, the technology giant said it had achieved a breakthrough on a core component of 5G network technology that could provide speeds of tens of gigabits per second -- the first adaptive array transceiver operating in the millimeter-wave for the Ka bands, providing transmissions up to several hundred times faster than 4G. Currently, state-of-the-art networks, using 4G LTE technology, can achieve a maximum of about 75 megabits.

Chang Yeong Kim, Executive Vice President of Samsung Electronics, said in a statement that "the millimeter-wave band is the most effective solution to recent surges in wireless Internet usage." He added that the company's success in developing adaptive array transceiver technology "has brought us one step closer to the commercialization of 5G mobile communications in the millimeter-wave bands."

A Wider Pipe

Samsung said its 5G technology uses the 28 GHz waveband, and 64 antenna elements have been utilized to achieve a transmission speed of 1.056 Gbps for a distance up to two kilometers. The South Korean company noted that a high-speed 5G cellular network requires a broad band of frequencies, "much like an increased water flow requires a wider pipe."

Millimeter-wave bands had been thought problematic for long-distance transmission because of propagation loss, which the 64 antenna elements counteract. Successful development and deployment of its 5G technology could put Samsung in a commanding position in those markets, even if it is required to license the technology to others at a reasonable rate, as owners of essential technologies are sometimes obligated by law.

Samsung said it is planning to make the technology available by 2020, which is also when the European Commission has said it expects to have its 5G technology up and running. The EU said earlier this year that it was investing 50 million euros into 5G R&D. In February of last year, China established a government-run research group for 5G next-generation transmission technologies. The next stage of 4G LTE had been expected to be so-called 4.5 networks that feature enhanced 4G speeds.

'In the Real World'

Avi Greengart, an analyst with industry research firm Current Analysis, said that, even though the speed of the still-rolling-out 4G LTE networks can seem quite impressive, more speed "is always beneficial." He noted that, "if we had devices with faster connections, we would take advantage of them."

Greengart added that consumers and businesses always seem to find some uses for faster access, plus there's the fact that, "in the real world," advertised speeds aren't always achieved. Often, networks and user congestion present constraints on actual throughput.

Another factor in favor of 5G, he said, is that "newer network technologies are often more efficient than the older ones, with a better use of the spectrum." He pointed out that this additional efficiency is "better for both carriers and consumers," because it allows faster speeds for consumers during peak hours and more customers for carriers.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:





 Mobile Tech
1.   Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
2.   Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
3.   Review: Amazon's New Fire Phone
4.   Apple Smart Watch Patent Surfaces
5.   iPhone 6: Bad for Apple Tablet Sales?


advertisement
Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
It coulda been a contender -- but isn't.
Average Rating:
Review: Amazon's New Fire Phone
New ways to navigate, discover, shop.
Average Rating:
iPhone 6: Bad for Apple Tablet Sales?
Most likely, it will be a huge hit.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
A late entry into a packed category of smartphones, Amazon's Fire phone offers a variety of unique features. Now, the reviewers are assessing if they're enough to make the phone stand out.
 
Review: Amazon Fire Offers New Ways To Use Phones
The Fire phone uses Android, but Amazon has modified it to the point that it's barely recognizable. That means the phone offers new ways to navigate, discover and, of course, shop.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.