Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
World Wide Web
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Censorship Claims as Google Cuts Search Results
Censorship Claims as Google Cuts Search Results

By Juergen Baetz
July 6, 2014 9:54AM

    Bookmark and Share
The "right to be forgotten" is getting real in the European Union. As Google has begun to comply with a strict privacy ruling made in May by the European Union's top court that enables citizens to ask for the removal of embarrassing personal information, the British media and others are saying removing articles is a "challenge to press freedom."
 



Google's removal of some search results in Europe is drawing accusations of press censorship. The U.S. firm has to comply with a strict privacy ruling made in May by the European Union's top court that enables citizens to ask for the removal of embarrassing personal information that pops up on a search of their names.

At least three British media, including the Guardian newspaper and public broadcaster BBC, said they have been notified by Google that links to some of their articles were removed from search results in Europe.

The Guardian said six articles have been removed in what the newspaper calls a "challenge to press freedom." The BBC said one critical blog entry by its economics editor was removed, while the Mail Online saw four articles hit.

"It is the equivalent of going into libraries and burning books you don't like," Mail Online publisher Martin Clarke said.

BBC Economics Editor Robert Peston said Wednesday the removal of his 2007 blog post, which was critical of Merrill Lynch's then-CEO Stan O'Neal, means "to all intents and purposes the article has been removed from the public record, given that Google is the route to information and stories for most people."

Google has a market share of 90 percent in Europe's search market.

The company says it has already received more than 50,000 removal requests and its experts are going through them. The company is not saying how many appear to fall into areas the court specified as potentially objectionable: results that are "inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant."

Google is only starting to implement the ruling, and several German media contacted Thursday said they had not yet received notifications on articles scrubbed from search results.

The company from Mountain View, California, finds itself in an uncomfortable position. It has no choice but to comply with the ruling by the EU top court, which cannot be appealed, but many decisions to remove search results are likely to draw criticism.

"This is a new and evolving process for us," Google spokesman Al Verney said Thursday. "We'll continue to listen to feedback and will also work with data protection authorities and others as we comply with the ruling."

Proponents of the court decision say it gives individuals the possibility to restore their reputation by deleting references to old debts, past arrests and other unflattering episodes. They also note that the court specified Google should not remove links to information when the public's right to know about it outweighs an individual's right to privacy -- for example when a politician or public figure seeks to clean online records.

The purge of search results will apply to Google's local search pages covering the EU's 28 member nations and four other European countries, encompassing more than 500 million people. Users in Europe who switch to the firm's American domain, Google.com, will find unaltered search results.

Moreover, Google is only deleting information that appears on its own results pages. It has no control over information on external websites, which did not fall under the court's ruling.
 


© 2014 Associated Press/AP Online under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:





 World Wide Web
1.   'Right To Be Forgotten': 26 Questions
2.   Tor Working To Fix Security Exploit
3.   Twitter Admits to Diversity Problems
4.   Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
5.   Internet of Things Comes to DIYers


advertisement
Radical.FM's Freemium Biz Model
Online radio startup asks for donations.
Average Rating:
Facebook Social Experiment Irks Us
Secretive test was legal, but ethical?
Average Rating:
'Right To Be Forgotten': 26 Questions
EU regulators probe Google, others.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.