Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Personal Tech
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Patent Filed for Laser-Projected Keypad with Google Glasses
Patent Filed for Laser-Projected Keypad with Google Glasses

By Barry Levine
January 18, 2013 2:36PM

    Bookmark and Share
Google Glass will have a tiny camera on one stem and, according to Google's patent application, the camera could then process the gestures on the laser projection. The Google Glass projection could, for instance, be a keypad cast on a left hand, and that hand's movement -- a thumb moving this way, the hand turned that way -- could indicate numbers or letters.
 



As if an interactive data overlay on everything you see wasn't enough, Google may have another futuristic innovation in mind for its Project Glass interactive eyewear. The technology giant has filed a patent application for a tiny laser to project a virtual keypad from the side of the glasses onto a surface such as your hand. The glasses can then tell the numbers or letters chosen by how you move your hand.

The keypad, or keyboard, could be projected onto any surface, but the movement of the body part or the background pattern becomes part of the interpreted input. The glasses already have voice input, so the projected pattern is for those times -- even in the future, as close as it may be -- when a user just needs to input information silently.

Such input could be appropriate for those times when speaking your thoughts or commands through the glasses' voice commands is simply not appropriate. Hopefully, libraries will remain relatively voice-free zones long into the future, for instance. On the other extreme, some environments could simply be too noisy for voice input to work.

Pattern on a Surface

Google Glass will have a tiny camera on one stem, and, according to the patent application, the camera could then process the gestures on the projection. The projection could, for instance, be a keypad cast on a left hand, and that hand's movement -- a thumb moving this way, the hand turned that way -- could modify the pattern and thereby indicate a choice of numbers or letters.

In fact, there's nothing in the patent application, Methods and Systems for a Virtual Input Device, to prevent the projection from being something other than an alphanumeric grid like a keypad or keyboard. The application, No. 20130016070, describes the projector casting "a pattern on a surface," so the projection could conceivably be, say, an image of a rotating Earth, which the user can "spin" or select a country with one hand.

The location of a gesture -- that is, what a finger might be selecting -- could be based on any number of changes to the image, such as the brightness level, a change in the area, or a comparison between the projected image and a background.

Laser-Projected Keyboards

Projected input devices, such as keyboards, are not new. One can buy such a laser-generated keyboard for $150 at Walmart, or another such product at Hammacher Schlemmer for $200. The U.S. Patent Office will need to determine if Google's variation is sufficiently new to warrant a patent, but the novelty here appears to be that changes to the projection by a body part or the background become a key means of interpreting the input.

The Google Glass titanium-framed glasses headset was first revealed at Google's I/O developer conference in the summer of last year. Babak Parviz, head of the Google Glass project, has told news media that the device is still being developed and, at any rate, will represent not simply a collection of input devices, but an "entirely new platform."

The glasses aren't expected to be available for consumers until next year, although the company has indicated it is planning to release a version to selected developers later this year. The price of the first incarnation is estimated to be about $1,500.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Randall Reimer:

Posted: 2013-01-19 @ 3:44pm PT
Why project at all? Just put the keyboard on the screen and track fingers in space.

Greg Madison:

Posted: 2013-01-18 @ 5:05pm PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAFuNzHQZqU

I was a finalist in the Microsoft Imagine Cup with this project in 2009, just before the 6th Sense came out. Ironically, it is called the 7th Sense.The concept is very similar to mine!
http://fr.slideshare.net/gregmadison/the-7th-sense



Salesforce.com is the market and technology leader in Software-as-a-Service. Its award-winning CRM solution helps 82,400 customers worldwide manage and share business information over the Internet. Experience CRM success. Click here for a FREE 30-day trial.


 Personal Tech
1.   Internet of Things Comes to DIYers
2.   Social Media Haters Speak Up
3.   Nvidia Revamps Shield as Game Tablet
4.   Netflix Tops 50 Million Subscribers
5.   Verizon Boosts FiOS Upload Speeds


advertisement
Facebook Social Experiment Irks Us
Secretive test was legal, but ethical?
Average Rating:
Social Media Haters Speak Up
Survey says, now showing a little love.
Average Rating:
Netflix Tops 50 Million Subscribers
Marquee show helps boost earnings.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 
34 European Banks Hit by Android-Skirting Malware
Criminals have been finding gaping holes in Android-based two-factor authentication systems that banks around the world are using. The result: 34 banks in four European countries have been hit.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 
Contrary to Report, Lenovo's Staying in Small Windows Tablets
Device maker Lenovo has clarified a report that indicated it is getting out of the small Windows tablet business -- as in the ThinkPad 8 and the 8-inch Miix 2. But the firm said it is not exiting that market.
 
Seagate Unveils Networked Drives for Small Businesses
Seagate is out with five new networked attached storage products aimed at small businesses. The drives are for companies with up to 50 workers, and range in capacity from two to 20 terabytes.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.