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Largest DDoS Attack Ever Is Over; Used Unsecured DNS
Largest DDoS Attack Ever Is Over; Used Unsecured DNS

By Barry Levine
March 28, 2013 11:20AM

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The attackers used an amplified DNS reflection technique, in which a DNS request is sent that pretends to come from the victim site, and the unsecured DNS server responds to the site. DNS servers that have not been properly secured can amplify an incoming request, resulting in responses that could be 50 times the request, overwhelming the victim site.
 



The good news is that the largest cyberattack in history is over, and the Net is still standing. The bad news: It could happen again.

The Internet was caught in the crossfire between Spamhaus, a Europe-based non-profit that fights spam, and CyberBunker, a Dutch hosting facility. Spamhaus said it traced substantial streams of spam emanating from CyberBunker, and they put CyberBunker on a blacklist they send to e-mail services, thus resulting in millions of inboxes being blocked from those streams.

Spamhaus' efforts have been estimated to filter out an estimated 80 percent of spam, and many industry observers consider it critical to maintaining a workable global e-mail system. CyberBunker says it is "the only true independent hosting provider in the world," and it will allow customers to host anything, anonymously, except "child porn and anything related to terrorism."

'Scourge of the Internet'

CyberBunker countered the blacklisting with the largest Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack in history. The attack centered on Spamhaus's DNS servers, which are deliberately spread around the globe in order to lessen any counterattack, but the downside was that the volume of the attack was so great, the spillover then clogged the Net around the world. According to Spamhaus, the attacks at their peak were about 300 gigabits per second, compared with attacks against major banks that average in the 50 Gbps range.

During the attack, Spamhaus requested help from California-based security firm CloudFlare. The attackers used an amplified DNS reflection technique, in which a DNS request is sent that pretends to come from the victim site, and the unsecured DNS responds to the site. DNS servers that have not been properly secured can amplify an incoming request, resulting in responses that could be 50 times the request. When those responses are amplified, the traffic can overwhelm the victim site.

Domain Name System computers translate the text in Web addresses into numerical IP addresses that computers use, so if a DNS server is unavailable, Web users routed to that server cannot access Web sites.

In a posting on its corporate blog last week, CloudFlare's Matthew Prince joined others who have noted that DNS servers are a vulnerable spot in the Web.

"Open DNS resolvers are quickly becoming the scourge of the Internet," Prince wrote, "and the size of these attacks will only continue to rise until all providers make a concerted effort to close them." (continued...)

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