Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Eliminate costly downtime!
Find out how with Free White Paper
& enter to win a Samsung Galaxy Note

www.apc.com
World Wide Web
See data differently
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Under Pressure, Instagram Reverts to Old Policy
Under Pressure, Instagram Reverts to Old Policy

By Barry Levine
December 21, 2012 1:54PM

    Bookmark and Share
Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom reiterated a statement in his reply earlier in the week to the controversy, saying that Instagram "has no intention of selling your photos, and we never did." In the future, he added, Instagram is "going to take the time to complete our plans" and then present them with more details for user feedback.
 



It was the Week That Was for Instagram. After a tumultuous four days of angry users and bad press, the photo sharing site has announced that it is going back to language in its old user policy.

In a posting Thursday on its corporate blog, co-founder Kevin Systrom wrote that, "because of the feedback we have heard from you, we are reverting" the advertising-related section of the new Privacy Policy and Terms of Use to "the original version that has been in effect since we launched the service in October 2010."

In the Future...

In the future, he added, instead of getting permission from users about possible advertising products "we have not yet developed, we are going to take the time to complete our plans" and then present them with more details for user feedback. The implication is that the proposed, and rejected, Privacy Policy and Terms of Use present what-if scenarios without tangible examples.

Systrom also reiterated a statement in his reply earlier in the week to the controversy, saying that the site "has no intention of selling your photos, and we never did." He added that "we don't own your photos -- you do."

On Monday, Instagram had released a new Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which were intended to take effect in 30 days. They soon led to a major backlash from users, including angry postings and account cancellations. On Tuesday, Systrom promised to fix the terms in the two documents, saying that "we're listening" and that the language had been misinterpreted "by many that we were going to sell your photos to others without any compensation."

Identification of Ads

He said that such an interpretation is "not true and it is our mistake that this language is confusing," added that the company "does not claim any ownership rights over your photos," and promised to fix the language.

The Monday documents included a section that said "a business or entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotion, without any compensation to you." It also noted that "paid services, sponsored content, or commercial communications" will not always be labeled as such, meaning that users could not tell what was an ad or not. In addition, the policies indicate no way to opt out of these terms, except to cancel one's account.

It's possible that the newest policies, containing some sections with language from the previously existing policy, may still not satisfy users and Instagram-watchers, now that these issues have been raised. For instance, the newest Terms of Use still says that the site "may not always identify paid services, sponsored content, or commercial communications as such." It also retains the right to place "advertising and promotions on the Service or on, about, or in conjunction with your Content."

In the spring, Facebook bought Instagram for $1 billion in cash and stock. In announcing the deal, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said at the time that Instagram would be allowed an independent identity, but it is clear the photo sharing site is following Facebook's example in monetizing the site -- and, apparently, in alienating its users over badly received privacy and user policies.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



APC has an established a reputation for solid products that virtually pay for themselves upon installation. Who has time to spend worrying about system downtime? APC makes it easy for you to focus on business growth instead of business downtime with reliable data center systems and IT solutions. Learn more here.


 World Wide Web
1.   Bell Labs Pushes Copper Line to 10 Gbps
2.   Escort Charged in Google Exec Death
3.   Google, SAP, More Fight Patent Trolls
4.   NY Reaches Price Limit Deal with Uber
5.   Germany Probes New U.S. Spy Case


advertisement
Facebook Social Experiment Irks Us
Secretive test was legal, but ethical?
Average Rating:
Escort Charged in Google Exec Death
Allegedly injected fatal heroin dose.
Average Rating:
Google, SAP, More Fight Patent Trolls
Firms want to innovate, not litigate.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Report: Chinese Hackers Hit U.S. Personnel Networks
Hackers from China broke into the computer networks of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management earlier this year with the intention of accessing the files of tens of thousands of federal employees.
 
Charges: Russian Stole Data from U.S. Restaurants, Zoo
A Russian man arrested on bank fraud and other charges hacked into computers at restaurants in Washington, hundreds of other retail businesses, and even the Phoenix Zoo, authorities say.
 
Another Month, Another IE-Focused Patch Tuesday
Microsoft rolled out 59 vulnerabilities for Internet Explorer in June. But the IE-patching party is not over yet. Redmond published six new security bulletins on Tuesday; two, critical; three, important.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Another Day, Another Internet of Things Consortium Is Born
In the emerging Internet of Things, zillions of devices will be talking to each other. Samsung, Intel and Dell just formed a consortium to ensure each thing can understand what others are saying.
 
Gartner Sales Study Sees Tablets Up, PCs Down but Recovering
Are PCs on the comeback trail? That depends on how you define "comeback." While tablet sales remain strong, Gartner's latest study found PC shipments aren't dropping as fast as they did last year.
 
Review: Warming Up to Tablets with Keyboard Covers
If you've ever thought tablets with keyboard covers were just a poor excuse for a laptop, think again. Nokia's Lumia 2520 comes with an optional keyboard cover that just may change your mind.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | Small Business | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.