Dear Visitor,

Our system has found that you are using an ad-blocking browser add-on.

We just wanted to let you know that our site content is, of course, available to you absolutely free of charge.

Our ads are the only way we have to be able to bring you the latest high-quality content, which is written by professional journalists, with the help of editors, graphic designers, and our site production and I.T. staff, as well as many other talented people who work around the clock for this site.

So, we ask you to add this site to your Ad Blocker’s "white list" or to simply disable your Ad Blocker while visiting this site.

Continue on this site freely
  HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
NEWS & INFORMATION FOR TECHNOLOGY PURCHASERS. UPDATED 4 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / World Wide Web / Computer Pioneer Engelbart Dies at 88
Computer Pioneer Douglas Engelbart Dies; Invented Mouse
Computer Pioneer Douglas Engelbart Dies; Invented Mouse
By Barry Levine / NewsFactor Network Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JULY
03
2013
One of modern computing's visionary pioneers, Douglas C. Engelbart, has died. His inventions helped create today's personal computers, including the computer mouse and the graphical user interface.

Engelbart was 88, and his wife said he died at his home in Atherton, Calif., as a result of kidney failure.

One of his first innovations was the development of shared computing power in the 1950s, a time when the room-sized electronic calculators then known as computers were used by only one person at a time. He called this method "bootstrapping."

'Mother of All Demos'

During the 1960s, he led the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research International (SRI), funded by the Defense Department and NASA. Engelbart's team developed and then demonstrated a mouse and keyboard that allowed a user to interactively use a computer with results displayed on a screen, and the demonstration included text editing, hyperlinks, windows for navigation and video conferencing. This was a time when the world's computer scientists who worked with computers had to submit a stack of punch cards, followed by the results hours later.

The major demonstration of that technology, before a thousand computer scientists at the Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco on Dec. 9, 1968, was so pivotal to the development of modern computing that it has been called "the mother of all demos." The technology and approaches to computing were further developed at Xerox's famed Palo Alto Research Center, Apple Computer, Microsoft and elsewhere.

In 1963, Engelbart had invented the mouse, which initially had three buttons and, Engelbart thought, could eventually have as many as ten. Originally, it was a small wooden box with two metal wheels inside that determined the X-Y position of the on-screen cursor.

NLS, ARPAnet

A file system for the online retrieval of documents that he developed, called the oNLine System or NLS, was not only a precursor of later online applications, but later became the application for which ARPAnet was built to implement. ARPAnet later evolved into the Internet, and one of the two initial nodes of the ARPAnet was at SRI.

Engelbart had served in the U.S. Army during the second World War as a radar technician in the Philippines, and during that time he came across a later-to-be-famous article by physicist Vannevar Bush, "As We May Think," which presented the concept of a universal Relevant Products/Services system that Bush called Memex.

The idea became a goal in Engelbart's life, as he went to Oregon State and then University of California at Berkeley after the war. He worked for a government aerospace lab, the Ames Research Center in California, and later moved to SRI. His honors included the National Medal of Technology, the Lemelson-MIT Prize and the Turing Award.

He also received 21 patents, the last one of which -- received in 1970 -- was for the computer mouse. But the 17-year lifespan of the mouse patent barely went past 1984, when Apple's Macintosh first popularized the mouse. Since that time, about a billion computer mice have been sold.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Kevin a Kiwi from down u:
Posted: 2013-07-03 @ 3:41pm PT
A genius, a man before his time. What a contrast his attitude portrayed, when compared to the money hungry entrepreneurs who followed. He paid high tribute to those colleagues whose ideas and collaborate efforts led to many discoveries. Such humility is seldom seen today. We could do no worse than follow such an example.

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
MORE IN WORLD WIDE WEB

NETWORK SECURITY SPOTLIGHT
The culmination of the Cyber Grand Challenge, the world’s first tournament of automated computer security systems hosted by DARPA, will take place next month in Las Vegas, Nevada.
NEWSFACTOR.COM
NEWSFACTOR NETWORK SITES
NEWSFACTOR SERVICES
© Copyright 2016 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.