Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Neustar, Inc.
Protect your website & network
using real-time information & analysis

www.neustar.biz
Network Security
Register for a certification exam.
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Microsoft Encrypting Internet Traffic To Stop NSA Spying
Microsoft Encrypting Internet Traffic To Stop NSA Spying

By Seth Fitzgerald
November 27, 2013 12:14PM

    Bookmark and Share
Redmond has told journalists that it has yet to attain any sort of independent verification that the NSA targeted its fiber lines. But if Microsoft is looking to encrypt its Internet traffic, it likely has some sort of suspicion regarding the NSA's actions. That's why Microsoft is trying to prevent the NSA from getting its hands on any user information.
 



The NSA has seemingly become a loaded acronym with many people tying either illegal actions or useful surveillance to it. The misconceptions surrounding the U.S. NSA (National Security Agency) has made it a controversial topic among the general public, but that is not the case for some business leaders who know exactly what is happening with the NSA and why it matters.

Recently, it was reported that the fiber optic lines running between data centers of Microsoft and Google had allegedly been compromised. Now that this appears to be true, the companies affected by the revelation are scrambling to not only recover their reputations but to tighten up security surrounding their fiber lines to prevent further NSA spying.

Time for Encryption

In order to make the fiber lines more secure, Microsoft is reportedly going to be introducing a form of encryption to the data that is passing between data centers. Right now, these fiber lines are carrying unencrypted data meaning that no matter how sensitive a piece of information may be, the NSA can quite easily intercept it and examine it.

People close to Microsoft have told technology publications that executives at the tech giant will be meeting sometime between this week and early December to figure out what form of encryption will be most effective. By encrypting this traffic, it would suddenly become very difficult for the NSA and its British counterpart, the GCHQ, to intercept data and use it for anything.

Microsoft has told journalists that it has yet to attain any sort of independent verification stating that the NSA targeted the fiber lines in this way. However, if the company is looking to encrypt its traffic, it likely has some sort of suspicion regarding the NSA, and is taking every precaution possible to prevent the NSA from getting its hands on any user information.

Is This Good?

Even though many Americans are disgusted by the NSA and its spying practices, there are some groups that appear to have no issue with the NSA intercepting traffic, tapping into phone lines, and reading e-mails. The reason for their position is that the NSA has been able to stop terrorists by attaining this information and, therefore, the agency is making the U.S. and its citizens safer.

Unfortunately, this simply is not true (or at least not in the way that pro-NSA citizens think it is). There are currently laws in place that require U.S. companies to hand over any data that is requested by the NSA or the federal government. As a result, if the agency intercepts traffic from fiber optic lines, it is not protecting the U.S. anymore than usual. Instead, it may actually be breaking the law.

NSA programs including PRISM and the "Five Eyes" agreement between Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the U.K., and the U.S. have apparently not been enough to satisfy the NSA even though these programs provide more than enough information to keep American citizens safe.

No matter how many terrorist attacks the NSA has stopped, not only is its system not foolproof (likely because it has too much information), but tapping into German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cell phone is not protecting any American interest, unless of course, the U.S. thinks Germany is somehow a major threat.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



APC has an established a reputation for solid products that virtually pay for themselves upon installation. Who has time to spend worrying about system downtime? APC makes it easy for you to focus on business growth instead of business downtime with reliable data center systems and IT solutions. Learn more here.


 Network Security
1.   Tor Working To Fix Security Exploit
2.   Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
3.   Dropbox for Business Boosts Security
4.   Hackers Breached StubHub Accounts
5.   Banks Hit by Android-Skirting Malware


advertisement
Android SMS Worm on the Loose
Malware lets bad actors cash in.
Average Rating:
Tor Working To Fix Security Exploit
Bug reportedly reveals ID of users
Average Rating:
New Technology Defeats Privacy Efforts
Study identifies 3 browser techniques.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 
Contrary to Report, Lenovo's Staying in Small Windows Tablets
Device maker Lenovo has clarified a report that indicated it is getting out of the small Windows tablet business -- as in the ThinkPad 8 and the 8-inch Miix 2. But the firm said it is not exiting that market.
 
Seagate Unveils Networked Drives for Small Businesses
Seagate is out with five new networked attached storage products aimed at small businesses. The drives are for companies with up to 50 workers, and range in capacity from two to 20 terabytes.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.