Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Hardware
Tame your scariest paperwork. Find Out How
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Oracle Says New Sparc Chips Are Fastest on the Planet
Oracle Says New Sparc Chips Are Fastest on the Planet

By Barry Levine
March 27, 2013 2:08PM

    Bookmark and Share
If Oracle's new Sparc servers fail to turn around Oracle's hardware fortunes, "it isn't because of the technology," said analyst Laura DiDio. She noted that Oracle CEO Larry Ellison got "great technology in the Sparc chips" when he bought Sun. Instead, she said, hardware revenue may be falling in part because the Sparc machines are lasting longer.
 



In hopes of reviving its hardware business, Oracle is refreshing its mid-range and high-end Sparc server product lines. The new T5 mid-range and M5 high-end Sparc servers, based around powerful new Sparc processors, are intended to reverse the slump that led to a 23 percent decline in hardware-related revenue for the most recent quarter.

Industries being targeted by the new servers include telecommunications, manufacturing and banking. The new T5-2, T5-4 and T5-8 replace the previous T4 servers, and the M5-16 and M5-32 replace the M9000 series.

John Fowler, executive vice president of Systems at Oracle, said in a statement that the new servers "leapfrog the competition with up to 10 times the performance of the previous generation."

The company said the new Sparc processors are the fastest on the planet.

'Sparc Was a Laggard'

CEO Larry Ellison has told news media that, "when Oracle bought Sun, a lot of people said, 'Gee, the Sparc was a laggard" and would never catch up. Oracle bought Sun in 2009 for $7.4 billion, but its hardware revenue has fallen every quarter since then.

Ellison noted that the company has doubled the performance of every new Sparc chip since the acquisition, and added that the T5-8 holds 17 world records, such as being the fastest single server for the company's flagship database program.

Now, Ellison said, the processor has caught up with and has passed competitors. Ellison said that the M5s and the T5s are more powerful than more expensive IBM Power servers, even though the Oracle machines use less power and occupy less space.

But IBM Technical Strategist Elisabeth Stahl, writing Tuesday on her personal blog, contended that "most of the claims are Oracle's own benchmarks that are not published or audited."

. 'Bullying Customers'

The new Oracle machines are optimized to work with Oracle's software products, and are part of the company's overall vision of becoming an end-to-end provider of software and hardware for cloud computing and other uses.

Laura DiDio, an analyst with industry research firm Information Technology Intelligence Consulting, said that if the new product lines fail to turn around Oracle's hardware fortunes, "it isn't because of the technology." She noted that Ellison got "great technology in the Sparc chips" when he bought Sun.

Instead, she said, there are a variety of issues that could block Oracle's hardware success. For instance, DiDio said, there is now a longer time between major hardware upgrades at many companies, in part because the machines are -- as customers have requested -- lasting longer.

But she also said that, if Oracle is "going to turn it around, they have to change their attitudes toward customers." She said "they're in this situation," at least in part, "because they haven't been treating their customers right," such as getting into legal fights with them over whether licensing compliances are being followed, changing warranty and maintenance agreements after they took over Sun, and generally "bullying customers."
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:





 Hardware
1.   MacBook Pros Get Update, Price Cut
2.   Watson's First Consumer-Facing Gig
3.   China To Call Qualcomm a Monopoly
4.   Design Central to Microsoft Future
5.   Schools Buy Million Chromebooks in Q2


advertisement
Design Central to Microsoft Future
New ethos a break from functional past.
Average Rating:
Most Networks Not Ready for IoT
But most enterprises are prepared.
Average Rating:
Gartner Sees Tablets Up, PCs Down
But PC sales are recovering.
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Canadian Government Charges China With Cyberattack
The government of Canada is not happy with China. Canadian officials have accused "a highly sophisticated Chinese state-sponsored actor" of launching a cyberattack on its National Research Council.
 
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Apple Updates MacBook Pros, Cuts Prices Up to $100
The popular MacBook Pro laptop line just got an update and a price cut of as much as $100. The MacBook Pro with Retina display now includes faster processors and double the memory.
 
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions of Users at Risk
Having this fake ID is nothing to brag about, even if you are a minor. The “Fake ID” Android flaw drops malware into smartphone apps. It can steal credit card data and even take over your device.
 
FTC Wants Fix for 'Perfect Scam' of Mobile Cramming
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has issued new guidelines to curb “mobile cramming,” a troublesome practice that adds unauthorized third-party charges to mobile phone bills.
 
Facebook: You Will Use Messenger, and You Will Like It
Starting this week, Facebook users with Android and iOS phones will be forced to use the separate Messenger app to send Facebook messages. Pending messages will still be visible in the main app.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.