Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Eliminate costly downtime!
Find out how with Free White Paper
& enter to win a Samsung Galaxy Note

www.apc.com
Mobile Tech
Capitalize on the Power of Big Data
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Teen Shows Battery-Charge Breakthrough at Intel Fair
Teen Shows Battery-Charge Breakthrough at Intel Fair

By Adam Dickter
May 20, 2013 4:10PM

    Bookmark and Share
Eesha Khare, 18, won a $50,000 scholarship from Intel for a "supercapacitor" that can not only charge a cell phone battery in 20 to 30 seconds, but can last 10 times longer than a traditional battery. The supercapacitor, which sounds like a device that would power the time-traveling car in "Back To The Future," has so far only lit up an LED test light, however.
 



How many times have you headed out the door in the morning and realized you forgot to plug your phone in to charge overnight? Or spent the day exchanging important texts or e-mails, only to have your phone die in the middle of a conversation?

Imagine being able to recharge your device's battery in just seconds. If an invention recognized in Intel's International Science and Engineering Fair reaches the mass market, it could soon be possible.

Could Power Cars, Too

Eesha Khare, 18, won a $50,000 scholarship from the chipmaking giant at last week's fair in Phoenix, Ariz., for a "supercapacitor" that can not only charge a cell phone battery in 20 to 30 seconds but can last 10 times longer than a traditional battery. The supercapacitor, which sounds like a device that would power the time-traveling car in "Back To The Future," has so far only lit up an LED test light, however.

"With the rapid adoption of portable electronics, Eesha Khare, 18, of Saratoga, Calif., recognized the crucial need for energy-efficient storage devices," Intel said in a statement announcing the winners. "She developed a tiny device that fits inside cell phone batteries, allowing them to fully charge within 20-30 seconds. Eesha's invention also has potential applications for car batteries."

Battery life is a key concern of consumers who are increasingly data hungry, gearing up with apps that not only raise their bill but drain their devices' batteries. Little progress has been made in drastically increasing energy storage, which has led manufacturers to focus their efforts instead on processors that better manage how the battery is used and which cores to shut down when not needed.

The ability to quickly recharge could be as useful as extending charge life and save heavy device users from having to carry spare batteries or even spare devices while on the go.

Promising Technology

"This does look promising," said Weston Henderek, a mobile devices analyst at Current Analysis.

"It could eventually be a major breakthrough. Battery charging technology is certainly one of the key roadblocks that the mobile industry has faced," Henderek told us. "In fact, if you look at the pace of innovation in other areas, battery life/charging is probably the area that has lagged [behind] all others. However, while this looks promising, it could end up being something that is still far off into the future."

Intel's top honor, the Gordon E. Moore Award, with its $75,000 scholarship, went to Ionut Alexandru Budisteanu, 19, of Romania, who designed an artificial intelligence system for a self-driving car. It includes 3-D radar and mounted cameras that Intel says could could detect traffic lanes and curbs, as well as track the real-time position of the car, and costs only $4,000.

Another winner of $50,000, Henry Wanjune Lin, 17, of Shreveport, La., discovered data that allows scientists to "better understand the mysteries of astrophysics, including dark matter, dark energy and the balance of heating and cooling in the universe's most massive objects."
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Dawn Roberts:

Posted: 2013-06-01 @ 2:53pm PT
Major kudos to Henry! He has chosen a dangerous field to work in and I look forward to seeing how far he goes. Good luck from one scentist to another.

Casey Bowler:

Posted: 2013-05-30 @ 2:31pm PT
This would be great for my computer and my phone it seems like I keep them plugged in all day and they both die within hours! I hope this works.

Laura Lineberry:

Posted: 2013-05-30 @ 11:07am PT
Hopefully this will work. My phone battery is always dying and takes forever to charge. I hope it gets here sooner than later.



Neustar, Inc. (NYSE: NSR) is a trusted, neutral provider of real-time information and analysis to the Internet, telecommunications, information services, financial services, retail, media and advertising sectors. Neustar applies its advanced, secure technologies in location, identification, and evaluation to help its customers promote and protect their businesses. More information is available at www.neustar.biz.


 Mobile Tech
1.   Is Apple Dumping iPhones on eBay?
2.   Data Recovered from 'Wiped' Phones
3.   Another Day, Another IoT Consortium
4.   Review: Advances in Smartwatches
5.   Qualcomm Moves Advance WiGig


advertisement
Android SMS Worm on the Loose
Malware lets bad actors cash in.
Average Rating:
Review: Microsoft's Surface Pro 3
Is it a tablet and laptop replacement?
Average Rating:
Review: Huawei's Mate2 Impressive
Many features for a reasonable price.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Another Month, Another IE-Focused Patch Tuesday
Microsoft rolled out 59 vulnerabilities for Internet Explorer in June. But the IE-patching party is not over yet. Redmond published six new security bulletins on Tuesday; two, critical; three, important.
 
Russian Arrested in Hacking Case Filed in Seattle
The U.S. Secret Service has arrested a Russian man who is accused of hacking store computers to steal thousands of credit card numbers, charging him with bank fraud, identity theft and more.
 
More Than Half of Networks Not Ready for Internet of Things
Most enterprises are prepared for the IoT and see its business potential. But the reality is that there may not be enough network capacity to handle the increased demand in connected devices.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Another Day, Another Internet of Things Consortium Is Born
In the emerging Internet of Things, zillions of devices will be talking to each other. Samsung, Intel and Dell just formed a consortium to ensure each thing can understand what others are saying.
 
Gartner Sales Study Sees Tablets Up, PCs Down but Recovering
Are PCs on the comeback trail? That depends on how you define "comeback." While tablet sales remain strong, Gartner's latest study found PC shipments aren't dropping as fast as they did last year.
 
Review: Warming Up to Tablets with Keyboard Covers
If you've ever thought tablets with keyboard covers were just a poor excuse for a laptop, think again. Nokia's Lumia 2520 comes with an optional keyboard cover that just may change your mind.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | Small Business | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.