HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
NEWS & INFORMATION FOR TECHNOLOGY PURCHASERS. UPDATED 5 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / World Wide Web / FCC: Internet Congestion Seen at Points
Close the insights gap
Between you and your customers with Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
See real-time CRM work
FCC: 'Serious' Internet Congestion Found at Some Points
FCC: 'Serious' Internet Congestion Found at Some Points
By Jeffrey J. Rose / NewsFactor Network Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JUNE
19
2014


Congestion on the Internet is real and in some cases very serious, according to FCC and academic studies measuring broadband speeds at various points in the U.S. Both studies found backups at some points connecting Internet service providers and the network's backbone -- the equivalent of on-ramps -- that affected quality of service, particularly for high-demand uses like Netflix video streaming.

"During our testing we noticed that at certain points through the test network we saw some very serious congestion," said a Federal Communications Commission official in a conference call with news media. "We aren't prepared to make conclusions right now, but we will be looking at how video service providers are affected by this congestion."

18-Hour Slowdowns

David Clark, a senior research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, said Wednesday that his study's preliminary data shows congestion seems to be mostly sporadic and temporary, lasting two to three hours at a time. But in some cases, he told a congressional briefing, the slowdowns at some interconnection points have lasted as long as 18 hours a day over several months.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said last week that his agency was looking into complaints by Netflix and backbone providers Cogent and Level 3 that ISPs were purposely allowing congestion, to pressure streaming video services into contracting with them for special treatment. The allegations appear against the backdrop of Wheeler's controversial proposal to allow ISPs to give some Internet traffic priority over other traffic, abandoning the FCC's previous doctrine of so-called Net neutrality.

A federal appeals court threw out the Net neutrality regulations in January. The FCC chairman then proposed replacement rules in May that critics maintain would curb freedom of speech on the Internet. Many of the biggest companies on the Internet -- including Google, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft, Netflix, Dropbox and Yahoo -- oppose Wheeler's proposal to allow paid "fast lanes," saying it would threaten innovation.

Clark's ongoing congestion study is being conducted by MIT and the Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis at the University of California San Diego Supercomputer Center. The data is preliminary, and the study does not yet assign fault for the congestion, Clark said at the briefing with the Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee.

He said the FCC's probe was warranted. "It may be appropriate for the FCC to clear its throat and say, 'What's going on here?' " Clark said. In some cases, "this has been going on for months."

Measuring Broadband America

The FCC's congestion observations were preliminary, based on raw data, and came incidental to its fourth annual Measuring Broadband America report, which looks at how actual service provided by broadband providers measures up to advertised claims.

That report found that in general, cable- or fiber-based ISPs deliver or exceed their advertised network speeds, with average download speeds running 97 percent of advertised speeds during peak usage hours.

Not so much for DSL-based providers, which face technological hurdles. DSL providers Qwest/Centurylink, Verizon, Frontier and Windstream all failed to provide at least 90 percent of advertised speeds during peak usage hours, the FCC found.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Roslyn Layton:

Posted: 2014-06-22 @ 11:07am PT
Dear Mr. Rose, it appears that you exaggerate the seriousness of the problem. Please see the MIT-UCSD report which concludes:

"Our data does not reveal widespread a congestion problem among the U.S. providers. Most congestion we see can be attributed to recognized business issues, such as interconnection disputes involving Netflix. These issues are being resolved, if slowly. Congestion does not always arise over time, but can come and go essentially overnight as a result of network reconfiguration and decisions by content providers as to how to route content." You reference to 18 months with regard to Comcast and Netflix refers to the length of the dispute, not the length of the congestion. Please see the report from the MIT-UCSD presentation at the Internet Caucus. https://ipp.mit.edu/sites/default/files/documents/Congestion-handout-final.pdf

Charles:

Posted: 2014-06-20 @ 6:26am PT
South Korea is smaller than the state of Illinois.

BackFromTheFuture:

Posted: 2014-06-19 @ 2:30pm PT
Look at South Korea and how they dealt with their big recession (and unemployment) over a decade ago: a program to put unemployed to work, laying fiber. Result: the most advanced broadband nation, and a lot of derived economic activity. But in North America politicians can't even pull a high speed rail link...

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
TOP STORIES NOW
MAY INTEREST YOU
Salesforce.com is the market and technology leader in Software-as-a-Service. Its award-winning CRM solution helps 82,400 customers worldwide manage and share business information over the Internet. Experience CRM success. Click here for a FREE 30-day trial.
MORE IN WORLD WIDE WEB

Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

© Copyright 2014 NewsFactor Network, Inc. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.