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Mobile App Privacy Code Still Up In The Air
Mobile App Privacy Code Still Up In The Air
By Nancy Owano / NewsFactor Network Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JULY
26
2013



If companies agree to comply with the U.S. telecom agency's draft mobile app privacy code of conduct, you may soon know who wants to collect information from your smartphone apps. Does that mean each time you are asked to state your ZIP code or age, you will get to know if the information is being sent to marketing third parties? Yes -- maybe

The voluntary privacy code, issued in Washington Thursday, was designed to assure better transparency in the types of information that mobile apps collect and use.

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), which advises the White House on telecom and information policy issues, Thursday released news of a draft voluntary code for app developers to raise the bar on transparency.

Go Forth and Test

This code of conduct for mobile applications was hammered out after NTIA meetings seeking guidelines from industry and consumer groups about telling consumers what information an app collects and how that information is used.

Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information and NTIA Administrator Lawrence E. Strickling issued the statement on Thursday, referring to this "multistakeholder process" to develop the first privacy code of conduct aimed at improving disclosures on mobile devices.

"NTIA is pleased that today a diverse group of stakeholders reached a seminal milestone in the efforts to enhance consumer privacy on mobile devices. We encourage all the companies that participated in the discussion to move forward to test the code with their consumers," he said.

Corks are still on the bottle, though. The code of conduct is still in tentative mode. Companies are being encouraged to test the code out. In the absence of any official adoption, it would be difficult to say which companies will actually abide by the terms.

Developers and publishers that would choose to abide by the code would be accepting the practice of a "short form notice" code of conduct revealing the kinds of information being collected and by whom -- whether by, for example, ad networks, carriers, data resellers, government entities, operating systems and platforms, and social networks.

The data types disclosed would include biometrics, browser history, phone and text logs, contacts, financial data, medical information, user files and location.

ACLU Support

While the code is voluntary, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) issued its own statement on Thursday to say they support the code, "as a modest but important step forward for consumer privacy."

The code effort gives consumers a tool to pick the most privacy-friendly applications, said Christopher Calabrese, legislative counsel at the ACLU's Washington Legislative Office. (continued...)

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