Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Please click for more information, or scroll down to pass the ad, or Close Ad.
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Eliminate costly downtime!
Find out how with Free White Paper
& enter to win a Samsung Galaxy Note

www.apc.com
Personal Tech
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Smart TVs Underutilized, NPD Survey Finds
Smart TVs Underutilized, NPD Survey Finds

By Adam Dickter
December 28, 2012 2:08PM

    Bookmark and Share
NPD's survey of people using TVs that connect to the Internet found that less than 10 percent used them to access Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or other social media. Few used their devices to post photos or read e-mail. About 15 percent streamed music through services like Pandora. But most, just under 60 percent, accessed streaming video content.
 


High-tech TVs these days are pretty smart. The people using them? Maybe not so much. A new survey by research group NPD suggests that a majority of people who own televisions that connect to the Internet aren't using them to the fullest extent, and many of the available applications go unused. In fact, despite the extra cost, many viewers may be using the gadgets the same as they would an ordinary TV.

Some Internet content is proving popular, but it is over-the-top video content -- available independent of the Internet provider -- such as Netflix, Hulu or streaming music. Port Washington, N.Y.-based NPD's Connected Intelligence Application and Convergence report found that nearly six out of 10 consumers who own a connected HDTV are accessing those through the device. But users don't seem to be in much of a rush to access their e-mail or update their Facebook status via smart TVs.

They'd Rather Use Phones

"The decision is not for want of application choice, but rather seems to be focused on how consumers are used to interacting with their TV," said John Buffone, director of device research at NPD Connected Intelligence, writing on the company's blog. "HDTVs, gaming consoles, Blu-ray Disc players, and other connected devices offer an array of applications, ranging from Twitter and Facebook to Web browsing. But, in general, these have failed to resonate with the audience, not least because there are better platforms, such as the PC, tablet, or smartphone, for such services."

NPD's survey of people using TVs that connect directly to the Internet, or through set-top devices such as Apple or Roku found that less than 10 percent of users accessed Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or any of the major social media.

Few used their devices to post photos or read e-mail but about 10 percent used the smart TV's Web browser. About 15 percent streamed music through services like Pandora. But most, just under 60 percent, accessed over-the-top video content.

Avi Greengart, an analyst with Current Analysis, is not surprised.

"Most Web content is short-form, it can be hard to find, and while it can be highly social, it is poorly advertised. These factors make it ideal snacking material on a PC -- someone posts a clip to a social media service and you watch it -- but ill-suited for televisions, even smart ones," Greengart told us.

"The living-room TV is used for viewing communal long-form content. Streaming video fits that paradigm pretty well."

Too Many Choices?

The news is a mixed bag for TV makers, who are adding functionality that has yet to fully catch on, but good news for tablet and PC makers because, at least for now, they are still the dominant portals to the Internet, though the soaring smartphone market will likely give them a run for their money.

Add connected gaming platforms to the mix, NPD notes, as well as Blu-ray disc players, and that creates something of a confusing consumer experience. Buffone notes that, "While 15 percent of HDTV displays are connected directly to the Internet, that number increases to 29 percent of HDTVs screens due to these other devices."

This explains why the growing ability of devices to transfer content to each other seamlessly may gain popularity. Microsoft's Xbox, for instance, now has a Smartglass application that allows content from the platform to be switched or added to a smartphone or tablet or computer, either adding a second or third screen to the experience, or allowing you to take content with you when you leave the house and switch it back when you get home.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

JL:

Posted: 2012-12-28 @ 4:32pm PT
Tvs used for watching tv shocker.



Barium Ferrite Is The Future Of Tape: Barium Ferrite (BaFe) offers greater capacity, superior performance, and longer archival life compared to legacy metal particle (MP) tape. Click here to learn more.


 Personal Tech
1.   NYPD Twitter Campaign Backfires
2.   Samsung Gear Fit Geared for Exercise
3.   Google Sharpens Contact Lens Vision
4.   AT&T in $500M Net Video Partnership
5.   High Court To Hear Aereo Dispute


advertisement
BlackBerry Drops T-Mobile After Spat
Moving on to other carriers after snub.
Average Rating:
Is Zuckerberg Nuts To Buy Oculus VR?
$2 billion deal for unproven company.
Average Rating:
NYPD Twitter Campaign Backfires
Case of 'be careful what you wish for.'
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 
Where Do Web Sites Stand, Post-Heartbleed?
A security firm says the vast majority of Web sites have patched themselves to protect against the Heartbleed bug, but now there are questions raised on the reliability of open-source programs.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | Small Business | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.