Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
UCS Invicta: Integrated Flash
Deploy flash memory technology to
deliver peak workload performance.

Find out more>>
Mobile Tech
Gartner's #1 for endpoint backup
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Researchers Develop Powerful New Micro-Battery

Researchers Develop Powerful New Micro-Battery
By Barry Levine

Share
Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Share on Google Plus

The size of electronic devices have often been limited by the size of the battery, but now the battery can also be tiny, said professor William P. King. This is not, he said, "a progressive improvement over previous technologies," but instead it "breaks the normal paradigms of energy sources."
 


A micro-battery that can charge a thousand times faster than current batteries -- in the blink of an eye -- and a cellphone powered by that battery could jump start a car's dead battery. That vision of dramatically better energy-storage technology is offered by new research by the University of Illinois at Champaign.

The researchers published their findings in the April 16 issue of Nature Communications. William P. King, the Bliss Professor of mechanical science and engineering and leader of the research team, said in a statement that "this is a whole new way of thinking about batteries."

He added that these kinds of batteries can "deliver far more power than anybody ever thought," and that this microtechnology could have a profound effect not only on electronic devices but in transportation.

Power Versus Energy

Currently, users choose between power and energy, so that, for instance, capacitors can release a lot of energy quickly but can only store a small amount, such as broadcasting a radio signal over a long distance for a very short time. For other applications, such as playing a radio over hours, battery sources can hold a fair amount of energy but release it slowly.

James Pikul, a graduate student and a first author of the research paper, told news media that "if you want high energy you can't get high power," and, conversely, it's "very difficult to get higher energy" if you want high power. But this new technology offers both, and can be tuned over a range of power-versus-energy tradeoffs.

With these kinds of battery sources, sensors or radio signals could broadcast an estimated 30 times farther or devices could be manufactured that were 30 times smaller. Imagine, the researchers said, charging a credit-card-thin smartphone is less than a second.

Batteries usually have an anode, which is the minus side, and a cathode, the plus side. The researchers employed a new kind of fast-charging cathode, developed a fast-charging anode, and integrated them at the microscale.

'Breaks Normal Paradigms'

King told the BBC that the electrodes in the team's battery "have small intertwined fingers that reach into each other," which allows the battery to have a very high surface area even though the overall volume is very small, and allows the two halves to get very close together so ions and electrons do not have far to travel.

The researchers also used a process developed by another team at the university, which creates a lattice out of very small polystyrene spheres and fills in the space with metal. The spheres are dissolved away, leaving a 3D metal scaffolding into which a nickel-tin alloy creates the anode and manganese oxyhydroxide is the cathode.

King said that, until now, the size of electronic devices have often been limited by the size of the battery, but now the battery can also be tiny. This is not, he said, "a progressive improvement over previous technologies," but instead it "breaks the normal paradigms of energy sources."

But this future may take awhile, as manufacturing processes for the new batteries still need to be developed, safety issues have to be addressed and electronic systems that use them need to be developed.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there's a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know by accessing the white paper, "5 Things You Didn't Know About Cloud Backup". Access the White Paper now.


 Mobile Tech
1.   Glass Adds Voice Access to Contacts
2.   Samsung, B&N Partner on Nook Tablet
3.   Acer Desktop Box Rides Chrome Wave
4.   Apple Stock Soars Ahead of iPhone 6
5.   HTC One M8 Windows Phone Unveiled


advertisement
HTC One M8 Windows Phone Unveiled
Can be POS device for small business.
Average Rating:
Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions at Risk
Users: stick to apps from Google Play.
Average Rating:
Researchers Tout Battery Breakthrough
Lithium anode could triple capacity.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
UPS Stores in 24 States Hit by Data Breach
Big Brown has been breached. UPS said that about 105,000 customer transactions at 51 of its UPS Store locations in 24 states could have been compromised between January and August.
 
Cost of Target Data Breach: $148 Million Plus Loss of Trust
The now infamous Target data breach is still costing the company -- and its shareholders -- plenty. In fact, the retailing giant forecast the December 2013 incident cost shareholders $148 million.
 
Aruba Networks Handles Black Hat with Aplomb
It's not an easy job. Aruba Networks' task throughout the Black Hat USA conference in Las Vegas this month was to ensure thousands of attendees could connect without malicious attacks.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Acer's New Desktop Box Rides the Chrome OS Wave
Filling out its Chrome OS line, Acer is following the introduction of a larger Chromebook line earlier this month with a new tiny $180 desktop Chromebox and also a smaller Chromebook.
 
Three New Lenovo PCs Aimed at Business Users
Businesses everywhere want computing solutions that do more for less money, and Lenovo has unveiled three new desktop PCs that offer solid computing at a budget-minded price.
 
Aruba Networks Handles Black Hat with Aplomb
It's not an easy job. Aruba Networks' task throughout the Black Hat USA conference in Las Vegas this month was to ensure thousands of attendees could connect without malicious attacks.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Google Glass Adds Voice Access to Phone Contacts
The latest update to Google Glass will let users access their top 20 phone contacts with voice commands alone. A user can then choose a phone call, Google hangouts, e-mail or text messaging.
 
Samsung, B&N Target Amazon with Nook Tablet
They've seen the enemy and it is Amazon. So Samsung and Barnes & Noble are teaming up to combat their common foe with a 7-inch tablet that blends Samsung’s tech, Nook’s content and e-reader platform.
 
Acer's New Desktop Box Rides the Chrome OS Wave
Filling out its Chrome OS line, Acer is following the introduction of a larger Chromebook line earlier this month with a new tiny $180 desktop Chromebox and also a smaller Chromebook.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.