Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
GET RECOGNIZED.
Let an ISACA® certification
elevate your career.

Register today and save
Personal Tech
Tame your scariest paperwork. Find Out How
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Review: Unlimited E-Book Services Offer Plenty
Review: Unlimited E-Book Services Offer Plenty

By Anick Jesdanun
July 12, 2014 11:11AM

    Bookmark and Share
New e-book services Oyster and Scribd are great if you have a long weekend or a vacation coming up. Just don't think it'll be the same as walking into a library and finding just about any book you want -- major U.S. publishers are holdouts. Still, there are plenty of titles available, and good recommendation systems to help you find your next read.
 



Two startups are trying to do for e-books what Netflix does for movies. Oyster and Scribd let you read as many books as you want for a monthly price -- $10 for Oyster and $9 for Scribd.

I was skeptical at first. I can never find enough time to read, and I'm picky about what I do read. I was worried about their limited book selections.

But I found plenty to read in no time, and I found myself reading more than I normally would. These services are great if you have a long weekend or a vacation coming up, or in my case three weeks of travels from California to New York.

Just don't think it'll be the same as walking into a library and finding just about any book you want.

The Selection

I checked several titles from my wish list and asked colleagues for other suggestions, including a few for kids or in foreign languages. Of the 75 I checked, Oyster had 17 and Scribd had 16. For some popular novels, such as "The Hunger Games" series and "A Fault in Our Stars," I got readers' guides and other companions, but not the actual books.

Both services have selected titles from Simon & Schuster, HarperCollins and lots of smaller publishers, but other major U.S. publishers -- Hachette, Macmillan and Penguin Random House -- remain holdouts. And even when there's a deal with a publisher, newer books tend to be excluded.

Avid readers won't be bored, though. When I signed up, Scribd asked about the types of books I like. Oyster didn't but still made good recommendations based on what other subscribers are reading.

I quickly found about two dozen books between the two services. Each time I added a title, I got recommendations for more. I just finished books on lobster populations and the Ben & Jerry's ice cream company. I'm now reading about Lance Armstrong and the doping scandal -- another book I wouldn't have known about if it hadn't popped up on Scribd.

In that sense, both services are much like Netflix. Netflix's streaming selection looks poor when you are searching for a specific title, but Netflix is smart enough to recommend enough movies to keep you paying $8 or $9 a month.

There are enough books to keep you busy for months or years. Oyster has more than 500,000 titles, while Scribd has more than 400,000.

The Apps

Neither Oyster nor Scribd works on dedicated e-readers such as Amazon's Kindle Paperwhite. Rather, you need a device that lets you install apps. (continued...)

1  |  2  |  3  |  Next Page >

 


© 2014 Associated Press under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:





 Personal Tech
1.   Verizon Throttling Data Speeds
2.   'Right To Be Forgotten': 26 Questions
3.   Civil War Battle Sites Get Mobile App
4.   Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
5.   Internet of Things Comes to DIYers


advertisement
Facebook Social Experiment Irks Us
Secretive test was legal, but ethical?
Average Rating:
Protect Yourself from Identity Theft
Even if your data was compromised.
Average Rating:
Review: Amazon's Unlimited E-Books
Service has some distinct limitations.
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
T-Mobile Calls 'BS' on AT&T's New Promotion
While Verizon Wireless is moving to throttle bandwidth hogs, a scrappy T-Mobile is taking on the giants with a limited-time promotion it hopes will drive up the churn rates of its wireless rivals.
 
Microsoft Update to Windows Phone 8.1 Already Coming
An update to Windows Phone 8.1 is on the way just weeks after the release of the product itself. Microsoft has begun detailing some of the update features to phone manufacturers.
 
Stanford Researchers Report Battery Breakthrough
Stanford researchers have found a way to use lithium in a battery's anode, a breakthrough that could triple capacity and has been described as the "holy grail of battery science."
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.