Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Tech Trends
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Study Predicts Continuing Growth for Graphics Industry
Study Predicts Continuing Growth for Graphics Industry

By Barry Levine
July 16, 2013 2:28PM

    Bookmark and Share
The hardware and software market for graphics in 2013 will be about $121.5 billion, an increase from 2012's $115.8 billion. By 2016, the graphics market will be larger than $142 billion annually. The hardware portion alone, which includes monitors, mobile components and gaming consoles, will reach nearly $107 billion this year, about $5 billion more than 2012.
 



If you think the graphics industry has reached its peak, time to reconsider. A new study indicates that demand for graphics-related hardware, software and skilled personnel is going to grow in the coming years, even if the PC industry is still struggling.

The study, released Tuesday by Jon Peddie Research, said the growth will be driven by mobile devices, games, and the use of high-end graphics in a variety of applications. Graphics are increasingly being used in many fields, such as engineering firms employing computer graphic-based visualizations prior to implementation.

The study noted that "we are seeing new opportunities growing out of more mainstream applications for the Web and consumer applications." As with so many other fields, the Web's role as a distribution medium is driving a demand for new graphical experiences, which is being made possible by high-end integrated graphics now being offered in a variety of computers and mobile devices, and by a wider availability of fast connectivity.

$142 Billion a Year

In fact, it's difficult to find any industry that is not using computer graphics in some degree. Virtually every major TV series or movie utilizes computer-generated graphics, Sony and Microsoft's new gaming consoles will drive the production of a new generation of graphically intensive games, mobile devices are getting high-end displays, Web-delivered experiences are increasingly becoming visual, and virtually every scientific field uses some form of visualization.

The report said the hardware and software market for graphics in 2013 will be about $121.5 billion, an increase from 2012's $115.8 billion. By 2016, the market will be larger than $142 billion annually.

The hardware portion alone, which includes monitors, mobile components and gaming consoles, will reach nearly $107 billion this year, about $5 billion more than 2012. In 2010, the total revenue of the computer graphics hardware market was about $93 billion.

Imaging, video, simulation, CAD/CAM, animation and modeling software will be nearly $15 billion this year, about a half-billion dollars more than last year, excluding services and maintenance. By 2016, the computer graphics applications market is expected to reach about $17 billion.

Renewed Desire

The report notes that "the sharp curtailment of household and corporate spending during the recession has resulted in a renewed desire among consumers and businesses to begin increasing spending on the latest graphic software and hardware platforms."

It also pointed to expansion in certain CAD/CAM oriented fields, such as the automotive, aerospace, or architecture industries, and predicted that visualization, "a market that has been almost dormant for the past few years," is ready for a burst of growth because of cheaper, more powerful visualization technologies.

With Apple reportedly trying to buy the company behind the Kinect gestural controller, gestural interaction becoming a new norm in video gaming and possibly in personal computing, and visualizations of every sort and level becoming common, the predictions from Intel, Advanced Micro Devices, and others that we have now entered the era of visual computing could mean that this boom in graphics hardware, software, and talent is just beginning its rise.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:





 Tech Trends
1.   Earnings, Excitement Grow for Apple
2.   Internet of Things Comes to DIYers
3.   Avaya Pressing Hard on Cloud-Based UC
4.   Design Central to Microsoft Future
5.   Schools Buy Million Chromebooks in Q2


advertisement
Avaya Pressing Hard on Cloud-Based UC
Provides easier, faster provisioning.
Average Rating:
Earnings, Excitement Grow for Apple
Momentum mounts as rumors swirl.
Average Rating:
Design Central to Microsoft Future
New ethos a break from functional past.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up its presence in foreign lands to keep the momentum going. But that tactic is proving tough in tablet computers.
 
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 
Contrary to Report, Lenovo's Staying in Small Windows Tablets
Device maker Lenovo has clarified a report that indicated it is getting out of the small Windows tablet business -- as in the ThinkPad 8 and the 8-inch Miix 2. But the firm said it is not exiting that market.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up its presence in foreign lands to keep the momentum going. But that tactic is proving tough in tablet computers.
 
Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
A late entry into a packed category of smartphones, Amazon's Fire phone offers a variety of unique features. Now, the reviewers are assessing if they're enough to make the phone stand out.
 
Review: Amazon Fire Offers New Ways To Use Phones
The Fire phone uses Android, but Amazon has modified it to the point that it's barely recognizable. That means the phone offers new ways to navigate, discover and, of course, shop.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.