Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Cloud Computing
Real-time info services with Neustar
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Yahoo Jumps Off Do Not Track Bandwagon
Yahoo Jumps Off Do Not Track Bandwagon

By Seth Fitzgerald
May 2, 2014 11:29AM

    Bookmark and Share
Falling in line with other major tech companies, Yahoo is dropping support for the Do Not Track initiative and will now ignore users' privacy requests. Yahoo's position is that Do Not Track is too broad. Rather than giving users a set of privacy options that can be personalized, DNT is just one setting that can either be enabled or disabled.
 



The Do Not Track (DNT) initiative has consistently been losing supporters -- Yahoo is the latest company to jump off the bandwagon. For more than two years Yahoo had agreed to protect user privacy if users had enabled DNT, but now the company announced that it will ignore those privacy requests.

All of the major Web browsers include the Do Not Track feature, but companies that rely on advertising have been hesitant about supporting it. As a result, larger tech companies like Google and Facebook have never paid attention to DNT settings. Now, Yahoo said DNT will not be enabled on its Web services because it would rather have users personalize their own privacy settings.

A Broad Request

DNT was implemented so that users who do not want their information to be recorded for advertising purposes can let Web sites know their preferences. With the feature enabled in Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, and other browsers, Web sites are notified that their visitors would prefer to not be tracked. However, even though the sites receives those notifications, they have no legal or technical requirements to respect them.

Arguments against DNT are not always aimed at its goal but rather the lack of privacy that it actually provides. Unless people are visiting just a handful of Web sites, they will always run into services that don't pay attention to the DNT header. Plus, with major ad networks not supporting it, users would be hard-pressed to find Web sites that only use pro-DNT ad services.

In a post on its policy blog, Yahoo explained why it felt that enabling Do Not Track across its platform no longer made sense. The primary complaint is that DNT is too broad. Rather than giving users a set of privacy options that can be personalized, DNT is just one setting that can either be enabled or disabled. In order to remain consistent, Yahoo does allow people to protect their privacy by manually disabling interest-based ads.

Few Supporters

The problem with any initiative like DNT -- even if the idea behind it is good -- is that profit-based companies must chose to respect the setting. If a company like Google were to support the initiative and chose not to collect advertising data from people who had the setting enabled, it could lose millions of dollars.

During the RSA conference in 2013, Google tried to explain why it would not acknowledge Do Not Track requests from a browser setting or plugin. Keith Enright, a senior policy counsel at Google, said that because there is no industry-wide standard for DNT, users are not always sure what their requests mean.

Google's view on the situation is similar to the views of Facebook, Yahoo and others -- only 21 of the major tech companies have committed to DNT.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

PrivacyIsGoodForBusiness:

Posted: 2014-05-02 @ 8:27pm PT
just add RequestPolicy and NoScript to block all those buggers at the doorstep. With a properly set RequestPolicy, the consumer-hostile code does not even waste your bandwidth or CPU cycles because no request for it is allowed to leave your PC.

And to Mr. "tired of whiney people": the internet was a much better and safer place before your friends Google and Facebook turned it into the biggest time waste in humanity's history.

tired of whiney people:

Posted: 2014-05-02 @ 1:49pm PT
Don't want targeted ads invent your own web browser and search engine and support them with millions of your own dollars to keep them secure. Otherwise shut up and watch the advertisements.





 Cloud Computing
1.   Cloud Wars: AWS vs. Microsoft, IBM
2.   Yammer Moved to Office 365
3.   IBM, California Partner in the Cloud
4.   Dropbox for Business Boosts Security
5.   Avaya Pressing Hard on Cloud-Based UC


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Canadian Government Charges China With Cyberattack
The government of Canada is not happy with China. Canadian officials have accused "a highly sophisticated Chinese state-sponsored actor" of launching a cyberattack on its National Research Council.
 
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Apple Updates MacBook Pros, Cuts Prices Up to $100
The popular MacBook Pro laptop line just got an update and a price cut of as much as $100. The MacBook Pro with Retina display now includes faster processors and double the memory.
 
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions of Users at Risk
Having this fake ID is nothing to brag about, even if you are a minor. The “Fake ID” Android flaw drops malware into smartphone apps. It can steal credit card data and even take over your device.
 
FTC Wants Fix for 'Perfect Scam' of Mobile Cramming
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has issued new guidelines to curb “mobile cramming,” a troublesome practice that adds unauthorized third-party charges to mobile phone bills.
 
Facebook: You Will Use Messenger, and You Will Like It
Starting this week, Facebook users with Android and iOS phones will be forced to use the separate Messenger app to send Facebook messages. Pending messages will still be visible in the main app.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.