Dear Visitor,

Our system has found that you are using an ad-blocking browser add-on.

We just wanted to let you know that our site content is, of course, available to you absolutely free of charge.

Our ads are the only way we have to be able to bring you the latest high-quality content, which is written by professional journalists, with the help of editors, graphic designers, and our site production and I.T. staff, as well as many other talented people who work around the clock for this site.

So, we ask you to add this site to your Ad Blocker’s "white list" or to simply disable your Ad Blocker while visiting this site.

Continue on this site freely
  HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
NEWS & INFORMATION FOR TECHNOLOGY PURCHASERS. UPDATED 14 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Apple/Mac / Why Did Apple Really Buy Topsy?
Why Did Apple Really Buy Topsy?
Why Did Apple Really Buy Topsy?
By Jennifer LeClaire / NewsFactor Network Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
DECEMBER
03
2013
Apple isn’t quite ready to compete with the social media giants, but that doesn’t mean the consumer electronics titan isn’t looking for more social intelligence. Apple has acquired Topsy for more than $200 million, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

Topsy offers Twitter insights that promise to detect and follow breaking news, drill into any new event, and get instant results. The social insight company will let Apple analyze competitor’s Web Relevant Products/Services and sets the stage for making better decisions through analyzing billions of Twitter conversations in real time.

Apple could not immediately be reached for comment, but a spokesperson told the Journal, “Apple buys smaller technology companies from time to time, and we generally do not discuss our purpose or plans.” Neither Twitter nor Topsy was immediately available for comment.

What’s Apple’s Plan?

We asked Greg Sterling, principal analyst at Sterling Market Intelligence, for his take on the reported deal. He told us it’s an unlikely acquisition but it may have several objectives. Topsy claims to have the only full-scale index of the public social Web and can instantly analyze any topic, term or hashtag across years of conversions on millions of Web sites.

“Among them Topsy may help Apple improve search and social recommendations for content. There may also be a Siri angle. And Topsy analytics -- the company has the entire Twitter search archive and ‘firehose’ -- may be useful in a number of ways,” Sterling said.

“This may also partly be a pricey ‘acqui-hire’ as well. I suspect the technology and Twitter access will be deployed in a number of ways by Apple over time. But the pairing of Topsy and Apple was definitely not obvious or expected,” he added.

An Advertising Play?

Topsy would not be Apple’s first social media play. The company previously launched Ping, a music-sharing service, that quickly shut its doors. Apple has also invested into other search tools, including Chomp for searching Relevant Products/Services apps. But this could have more to do with iAd.

iAd lets users stay within an app they are using and still engage with an advertisement, even while watching a video, playing a game, or using an in-ad purchase to download an app or buying digital media.

Apple generated strong interest in its iAd mobile advertising network in 2010. The network launched on the iPhone and iPod touch devices and attracted the likes of AT&T, Best Buy, Campbell Soup, Unilver, Geico, GE and Target. Indeed, Apple reported it posted more than $60 million in iAd commitments in 2010. That represented almost 50 percent of the total U.S. forecast for mobile-ad spending for the second half of 2010, according to J.P. Morgan.

The Journal speculated that Topsy could help Apple better monitor the social-media conversation around its products including targeted advertising on iTunes radio or the iAd platform.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
MORE IN APPLE/MAC

NETWORK SECURITY SPOTLIGHT
After years of being told by security experts that we should set up two-factor account authentication, new digital security guidelines from the U.S. government will no longer be recommending the practice.
NEWSFACTOR.COM
NEWSFACTOR NETWORK SITES
NEWSFACTOR SERVICES
© Copyright 2016 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.