HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
NEWS & INFORMATION FOR TECHNOLOGY PURCHASERS. UPDATED 5 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Microsoft/Windows / MS Targets Kinect for Computers, TVs
Build Apps 5x Faster
For Half the Cost Enterprise Cloud Computing
On Force.com
Microsoft Targets Kinect Controller for Computers, TVs
Microsoft Targets Kinect Controller for Computers, TVs
By Barry Levine / NewsFactor Network Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
MARCH
06
2013
Would you like to control your personal computer or TV by moving your hands in the air? On the heels of Leap Motion's announced rollout for its technology, Microsoft is getting its Kinect technology ready for use in computers, TVs and other non-gaming devices.

The company's chief research and strategy officer, Craig Mundie, told a technical gathering in Seattle this week that the long-term aim is to make the game controller as small and as inexpensive as possible, and to include it in a wide range of devices, including laptops, tablets and TVs. He said that this integration will not "happen tomorrow, but we can see a path towards that sort of thing."

At its new Envisioning Center on its main campus, Microsoft demonstrated Kinect embedded into a large-screen TV. The integration featured sensors that are reportedly considerably smaller and thinner than current ones. There were also reports last year that Microsoft was working with computer maker Asus to develop a Windows 8-based, Kinect-equipped laptop, but so far there has been no substantiation.

Greater Kinect Precision

One startup, Leap Motion, has announced a deal with Asus, which will be releasing high-end computers later this year with Leap Motion's highly precise gestural technology. Leap Motion has also announced that its controller and software will go on sale in May for $80.

One of Leap Motion's key advantages is its precise control, with in-the-air separate tracking of each of 10 fingers and each hand, and resolution up to 1/100th of a millimeter. The company has said its technology is as much as 200 times more sensitive than other motion-control systems. Recently, Microsoft Research demonstrated a greater precision for Kinect that can allow multi-touch capability and such functions as pinch-to-zoom.

Aside from the size and cost of Kinect, there are some other hurdles to overcome. For instance, Kinect is infrared based, which means that it does not work well if sunlight is present.

Touchscreen Versus Kinect

Ross Rubin, principal analyst at Reticle Research, noted that gestural interaction technologies are also being developed by other companies, such as PointGrab. But the key questions are not about the technology, but about the use cases and the usability.

He pointed out that, for a desktop or laptop computer, or for a mobile device, it's probably easier to simply reach out and touch the screen than to keep your gesture confined to the air in front. Gestural interaction becomes more natural, Rubin said, "in a midrange environment, such as a TV in a living room."

On the question of whether arm fatigue becomes an issue for either free-form gestures or touchscreens, Rubin said that fatigue "is more of an issue for touch" than Kinect-like gestures. He also predicted that there could be a use for gestural control in businesses, not only to control screens on walls, but for a "more natural interaction for data manipulation" -- not unlike the interaction shown in the movie Minority Report.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
TOP STORIES NOW
MAY INTEREST YOU
Verisign DDoS Protection: Detect and respond to DDoS threats quickly. Verisign's cloud-based monitoring and mitigation services provide a scalable solution to today's increasingly complex DDoS attacks. Click here to learn more.
MORE IN MICROSOFT/WINDOWS
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

© Copyright 2014 NewsFactor Network, Inc. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.