Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Eliminate costly downtime!
Find out how with Free White Paper
& enter to win a Samsung Galaxy Note

www.apc.com
World Wide Web
Tame your scariest paperwork. Find Out How
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
West Bank Man Hacks Zuckerberg
West Bank Man Hacks Zuckerberg's Facebook Page

By Adam Dickter
August 19, 2013 4:28PM

    Bookmark and Share
Facebook is in a tough position with the volume of reports it gets, but if you want to serve as 1 billion people's social life, you need to invest in appropriate security staffing levels. Facebook likes to compare itself to a nation-state, so a national defense is an important investment. Perhaps one it should take more seriously.
 



Mark Zuckerberg surely did not click the like button after a status on the social media king's Facebook page last week warned him, in undeniable fashion, of a security vulnerability.

Using only a dilapidated laptop at his home in the Palestinian territories, Khalil Shreateh figured out a vulnerability, which he has not publicly disclosed, that allows any Facebook user to post a message on anyone else's page without his permission, CNN reported.

Facebook said it wanted to investigate the flaw -- which could allow millions of Facebook users to freely advertise products or services, or just cause mayhem with people who have not accepted their friend requests -- but it did not have enough information.

Try And Try Again

Shreateh, who lives near Hebron and is looking for a computer-related job, insists he tried to warn Facebook's security division, to no avail, forcing him to unleash the attention-getting stunt.

Shreateh wrote about the exploit in a blog post and made a YouTube video about it. On the blog he included an exchange of emails, including a link to a post he said he made on the page of Sarah Goodin, a Harvard classmate of Zuckerberg's. The supposed response from Facebook was that the link he sent didn't work.

After a second attempt, he then did the same to Zuckerberg's page, he said.

The illicit message, which did not appear on Zuckerberg's page when we checked on Monday afternoon reads: "First sorry for breaking your privacy and post to your wall . . . I [had] no other choice to make after all the reports I made to Facebook team." Numerous websites captured images of the post before it was taken down.

Shreateh also posted an Enrique Iglesias music video to make his point. Although Facebook offers cash rewards for reports of legitimate vulnerabilities, unauthorized postings violate the company's terms of service, so Shreateh won't be getting any cash. Instead, his account was suspended, but later reinstated.

In fairness, Facebook's security team likely gets more security reports than it can quickly handle given its massive user base of around 1 billion accounts worldwide. But the easy hack creates the perception that the tech giant is more focused on ways to monetize the site to boost its unstable stock price than on beefing up security for users.

"Facebook is in a tough position with the volume of reports they get, but if you want to serve as 1 billion people's social life, you need to invest in appropriate security staffing levels," Chester Wisniewski, a senior analyst at the global cybersecurity firm Sophos told us.

"They like to compare themselves to a nation-state, so a national defense is an important investment," he said. "Perhaps one they should take more seriously."

In response to our emailed request for comment, Facebook spokesman Fred Wolens referred us to a post in a Hacker News forum by MK Jones, who works on a Facebook security team that investigates bug reports under the White Hat program.

Needed More Info

"[W]e get hundreds of reports every day," Jones said. "Many of our best reports come from people whose English isn't great -- though this can be challenging, it's something we work with just fine and we have paid out over $1 million to hundreds of reporters."

Though he said the information was sketchy Jones said, "We should have pushed back asking for more details here." He added that testing bugs with other people's accounts is a serious no-no, and that Facebook provides a way to create test accounts to show flaws "to help facilitate responsible research and testing."
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



Neustar, Inc. (NYSE: NSR) is a trusted, neutral provider of real-time information and analysis to the Internet, telecommunications, information services, financial services, retail, media and advertising sectors. Neustar applies its advanced, secure technologies in location, identification, and evaluation to help its customers promote and protect their businesses. More information is available at www.neustar.biz.


 World Wide Web
1.   Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
2.   Internet of Things Comes to DIYers
3.   Social Media Haters Speak Up
4.   New Technology Defeats Privacy Efforts
5.   Verizon Launches Rewards Program


advertisement
Radical.FM's Freemium Biz Model
Online radio startup asks for donations.
Average Rating:
Facebook Social Experiment Irks Us
Secretive test was legal, but ethical?
Average Rating:
Social Media Haters Speak Up
Survey says, now showing a little love.
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
New Web Tracking Technologies Defeat Privacy Protections
Recently developed Web tracking tools are able to circumvent even the best privacy defenses, according to a new study by researchers at Princeton and the University of Leuven in Belgium.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 
Contrary to Report, Lenovo's Staying in Small Windows Tablets
Device maker Lenovo has clarified a report that indicated it is getting out of the small Windows tablet business -- as in the ThinkPad 8 and the 8-inch Miix 2. But the firm said it is not exiting that market.
 
Seagate Unveils Networked Drives for Small Businesses
Seagate is out with five new networked attached storage products aimed at small businesses. The drives are for companies with up to 50 workers, and range in capacity from two to 20 terabytes.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.