Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Mobile Tech
24/7/365 Network Uptime
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Chromebooks Too Hot To Handle: Literally
Chromebooks Too Hot To Handle: Literally

By Adam Dickter
November 15, 2013 12:36PM

    Bookmark and Share
The problem with the Google/HP Chromebook micro-USB charger may be a manufacturing tolerance issue, a bad part in the supply chain, or an engineering issue. Most likely Google and HP are doing a detailed postmortem to determine the problem with the Chromebook USB charger, but they are not sharing those details with us, said one analyst.
 



As the market adjusts to tablets and notebooks battling it out, Google and Hewlett Packard surely hoped to have a hot Chromebook on their hands. But not literally.

Redfaced execs at both companies this week had to pull the latest version of the device, the HP Chromebook 11, out of the sales channel after reports from "a small number of users" that micro-USB chargers included with the device overheat during extended use and have been damaged. The Chromebooks themselves have not been damaged.

Use Another Plug

"We are working with the Consumer Product Safety Commission to identify the appropriate corrective action, and will provide additional information and instructions as soon as we can," Caesar Sengupta, Google's vice president of Product Management, said in a post on Google's Chrome Blog Wednesday.

He said HP Chromebook 11 customers should not use the original charger provided with the product. "In the interim they may continue using their HP Chromebook 11 with any other Underwriters Laboratories-listed micro-USB charger, for example one provided with a tablet or smartphone," Sengupta wrote. "We apologize for the inconvenience."

The Chromebook 11 malfunction comes just a month after its launch at $279, with an 11.6" display and weighing just 2.3 pounds. The previous model was made by Samsung Electronics. The low-cost devices built to run Google's Chrome operating system have been competing well with other devices in their class.

They are particularly attractive to students who don't like schlepping heavy laptops to class, or keeping expensive computers in their dorm rooms.

"From what I can tell, Chromebooks are taking share from the low end of the notebook market," said Avi Greengart, a consumer devices analyst for Current Analysis.

He said the timing was a setback for that growth. "Sales have been stopped right in the heart of the holiday shopping season."

Overheating has plagued a large variety of products, from iPods to big-screen TVs as well as other chargers and power supply products and laptop batteries made by Sony.

"Problems like this crop up from time to time everywhere," said Greengart.

Tolerance Issue?

"It could be a manufacturing tolerance issue. Or a bad part in the supply chain. Or it could be an engineering issue," he said. "Back in 2008, Apple had to recall some of its USB chargers because the prongs weren’t fastened secure enough internally. I’m sure Google is doing a detailed postmortem to determine the problem and ensure it doesn’t happen again, but they are not sharing those details with us."

According to research firm IDC, Chromebooks made up only 1 percent of worldwide PC and tablet shipments in the third quarter of 2013, compared to tablets with 36 percent and PCs with 36 percent. Samsung was the largest vendor with 652,000 units shipped.

Chromebooks are not yet as widely available outside the U.S. as are their competitors, however.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



Salesforce.com is the market and technology leader in Software-as-a-Service. Its award-winning CRM solution helps 82,400 customers worldwide manage and share business information over the Internet. Experience CRM success. Click here for a FREE 30-day trial.


 Mobile Tech
1.   Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions at Risk
2.   FTC Wants Fix for Mobile Cramming
3.   Facebook To Force Use of Messenger
4.   BlackBerry Acquires Secusmart
5.   T-Mobile Calls 'BS' on AT&T Promo


advertisement
Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions at Risk
Users: stick to apps from Google Play.
Average Rating:
FTC Wants Fix for Mobile Cramming
Overcharges are 'the perfect scam'.
Average Rating:
BlackBerry Acquires Secusmart
German security firm offers street cred.
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Canadian Government Charges China With Cyberattack
The government of Canada is not happy with China. Canadian officials have accused "a highly sophisticated Chinese state-sponsored actor" of launching a cyberattack on its National Research Council.
 
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Apple Updates MacBook Pros, Cuts Prices Up to $100
The popular MacBook Pro laptop line just got an update and a price cut of as much as $100. The MacBook Pro with Retina display now includes faster processors and double the memory.
 
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions of Users at Risk
Having this fake ID is nothing to brag about, even if you are a minor. The “Fake ID” Android flaw drops malware into smartphone apps. It can steal credit card data and even take over your device.
 
FTC Wants Fix for 'Perfect Scam' of Mobile Cramming
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has issued new guidelines to curb “mobile cramming,” a troublesome practice that adds unauthorized third-party charges to mobile phone bills.
 
Facebook: You Will Use Messenger, and You Will Like It
Starting this week, Facebook users with Android and iOS phones will be forced to use the separate Messenger app to send Facebook messages. Pending messages will still be visible in the main app.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.