HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
NEWS & INFORMATION FOR TECHNOLOGY PURCHASERS. UPDATED 13 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Personal Tech / Roku CEO Discusses State of Industry
Powered by Verisign:
Cloud-based solution to improve Your DDoS Attack Readiness.
Click here to learn more.
Roku CEO Discusses State of Internet Video, TV
Roku CEO Discusses State of Internet Video, TV
By Michael Liedtke Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JUNE
23
2014


If Netflix CEO Reed Hastings is the star of the Internet video-streaming phenomenon, then Roku CEO Anthony Wood is the best supporting actor. Both men play pivotal roles in popularizing technologies that are shaking up the entertainment and broadband industries.

While Hastings gets marquee billing for building an Internet video service with 48 million worldwide subscribers, Wood has quietly worked behind the scenes making Roku streaming devices that make it easier and more enjoyable to watch Netflix's vast library of movies and TV shows.

This isn't the first time Wood, 48, has helped change the way that people watch TV. In the late 1990s, he invented one of the first digital video recorders and started ReplayTV -- a company upstaged by fellow DVR pioneer TiVo Inc.

Roku, based in Saratoga, California, appears to be to doing so well that the privately held company is viewed as a prime candidate to go public during the next year.

Since its first streaming box debuted six years, Roku has sold more than 8 million devices used for streaming Internet video to the TV -- still the biggest and most-watched screen in the house. Roku offers about 1,500 streaming channels, including Netflix rivals such as Hulu and Amazon Prime.

Roku's early success prompted Apple Inc. to start treating its own video-streaming player as something more than a "hobby," as its late CEO Steve Jobs once dismissively described the device. About 20 million Apple TV streaming devices have been sold, according to current CEO Tim Cook, and the business generates more than $1 billion in annual revenue.

Both Google Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. also have launched video-streaming devices in the past year to establish a toehold in a rapidly growing market. About 35 percent of U.S. households now have TVs connected to the Internet, according to the research firm NPD.

Wood shared his views on the convergence of Internet video and television in a recent interview with The Associated Press. The conversation has been edited for clarity.

Q: Where is TV headed?

A: To me, it's pretty clear that all TV is going to be streamed. It's either going to be streamed to a smart TV, a gaming console or a streaming player. That's the way people are going to watch TV. Things like DVD players are going to go away. Cable boxes are obviously going away, too. DVRs are just a stepping stone technology. When everything is on demand, you won't have to record anything anymore so that's going to disappear. (continued...)

1  2  Next Page >

Read more on: Roku, Streaming Video, Netflix, DVR


© 2014 Associated Press under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
TOP STORIES NOW
MAY INTEREST YOU
Verisign DDoS Protection: Detect and respond to DDoS threats quickly. Verisign's cloud-based monitoring and mitigation services provide a scalable solution to today's increasingly complex DDoS attacks. Click here to learn more.
MORE IN PERSONAL TECH
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

© Copyright 2014 NewsFactor Network, Inc. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.