Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
UCS Invicta: Integrated Flash
Deploy flash memory technology to
deliver peak workload performance.

Find out more>>
Enterprise I.T.
Cisco UCS Invicta Series flash memory systems
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Leap Motion Intros Latest Air-Gesture Computer-Control Apps
Leap Motion Intros Latest Air-Gesture Computer-Control Apps

By Barry Levine
June 25, 2013 10:05AM

    Bookmark and Share
One potential irony could be if Leap Motion ends up making Windows 8's touch screen interface more popular. With this peripheral, users will be able to utilize the easy-to-target tile interface via arm gestures in front of the screen, possibly with less arm fatigue than using a touch screen.
 


The Minority Report-future is getting closer. This week, Leap Motion is unveiling for developers its latest software and its app store, in preparation for the July 22 release of its product enabling hands-in-the-air precise control of computers.

In a Monday posting on its corporate blog, the company noted that the early access developer community will be beta testing Mac and PC operating system interactions, as well as utilizing the new app discovery platform, called Airspace. About 10,000 developers are working with early versions of the software, and the company is planning to soon open up its developer portal beyond those currently in the beta program.

The OS interaction will feature the ability to scroll and click with simple finger moves in the air. A desktop launcher will house all Leap Motion apps, including existing apps that have become Leap Motion-compatible through the API, such as Google Earth.

Boom Ball, Block 54

An interactive tutorial will automatically run after Leap Motion software has been downloaded, in order to orient the user to the field of view and other parameters. The tutorial also allows a user/developer to view on the screen a wireframe display indicating how the controller sees your hands.

Some of the initial games designed for the technology include a ping-pong style game called Boom Ball and Block 54, a Jenga-like block-stacking game. Some apps will be free, and paid ones will range from 99 cents to more than $500 for professional applications. Currently, the app store has about 50 apps, but that number is expected to grow quickly. As one indicator of application development interest, venture capital firm Highland Capital Partners has announced a $25 million Leap Fund specifically for technology and applications related to the platform.

The controller, introduced about a year ago, offers a 150-degree field of view and a high-resolution capability to track all ten fingers up to 290 frames per second. The controller, described by the company as about the size of an iPod, is expected to be priced at $79.99.

The big competitor in the gestural interaction market is Microsoft's Kinect, recently shown in an updated version for the newest Xbox video game console. While there are ongoing efforts to port the Kinect for use with computers, Leap Motion is focused on that market, and the company has said that its technology is "two hundred times more accurate than any product currently on the market," down to 1/100th of a millimeter.

Coming to Windows 8's Rescue?

One potential irony could be if Leap Motion ends up making Windows 8's touch screen interface more popular, especially if Kinect doesn't soon step up to the task. With this peripheral, users will be able to utilize the easy-to-target tile interface via arm gestures in front of the screen, possibly with less arm fatigue than, say, continually reaching out to touch a desktop screen -- and without the need to buy a touch-screen display or a tablet.

Al Hilwa, Program Director for Application Development at IDC, said that there's "no doubt new styles of interaction with PCs are going to grow and even explode at some point," although he said the key task for Leap Motion and others is to "figure out how to make this interaction natural." He added that, at $80, the Leap Motion controller is probably a bit high in price for most consumers, and early application development will most likely focus on gamers and certain verticals, such as medicine.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Bob:

Posted: 2013-06-30 @ 6:23am PT
If this can make 3d modeling easy it's worth it.



Get Powerful App Acceleration with Cisco. In a world where time is money, you need to accelerate the speed at which data moves through your data center. Cisco UCS Invicta delivers powerful, easy-to-manage application acceleration for data-intensive workloads. So you can make decisions faster and outpace the competition. Learn More.


 Enterprise I.T.
1.   SAP Taps Apigee for API Management
2.   IBM Beefs Up Identity Intelligence
3.   USB Security Flaw Uncovered
4.   AMD Debuts 64-Bit ARM Server Chips
5.   Asana Revamps Mobile App


advertisement
IBM Beefs Up Identity Intelligence
To offer biz better security products.
Average Rating:
AMD Debuts 64-Bit ARM Server Chips
New Opterons target data center needs.
Average Rating:
Dell, BlackBerry Downplay Threat
Say Apple-IBM alliance can't hurt them.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Ruling Against Microsoft Raises E-Mail Privacy Concern
Microsoft has been ordered to hand over e-mails to law enforcers in the United States as part of a criminal investigation, even though the e-mail is stored at a data center in Dublin,Ireland.
 
Twitter Buys Password Manager Startup Mitro
Following on the heels of another acquisition earlier this week, Twitter is adding to its fold a password-manager security startup called Mitro, which in turn is releasing its code as open source.
 
Government Requests for Customer Data Skyrocket
Requests for customer data from the government jumped 50 percent in the first half of 2014, according to Twitter, which received more than 2,000 requests for user info from gov't agencies.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.